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REACH 24/7 Crisis Hotline (828) 837-8064


Do you want to talk?  We will listen.  All services are free and confidential.  We offer support groups, individual support, resources and referrals.  Call today or just drop by and let us help you now. 

REACH of Cherokee County, Inc. will lead our community in eliminating domestic violence & sexual assault through education, advocacy, self-empowerment and community awareness.

Support Center for Victims and Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault 

Domestic violence against men:  Know the signs


Domestic Violence against men isn't always easy to identify, but it can​ be a serious threat.  Know how to recognize if you're being abused -- and how to get help.


Women aren't the only victims of domestic violence.  Understand the signs of domestic violence against men, and know how to get help.  


Recognize domestic violence against men


Domestic violence-- also know as intimate partner violence - occurs between people in an intimate relationship.  


Domestic violence against men can take many forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse and threats of abuse.  It can happen in heterosexual or same-sex relationships. 


It might not be easy to recognize domestic violence against men.  Early in the relationship, your partner might seem attentive, generous and protective in ways that later turn out to be controlling and frightening. Initially, the abuse might appear as isolated incidents.  Your partner might apologize and promise not to abuse you again.  


​In other relationships, domestic violence against men might include both partners slapping or shoving each other when they get angry - and neither partner seeing himself or herself as being abused or controlled. This type of violence, however, can still devastate a relationship, causing both physical and emotional damage.


You might be experiencing domestic violence if your partner: 


  • Calls you names, insults you or puts you down
  • Prevents you from going to work or school
  • ​Stops you from seeing family members or friends
  • Tries to control how you spend money, where you go or what you wear
  • Acts jealous or possessive or constantly accuses you of being unfaithful
  • Gets angry when drinking alcohol or using drugs
  • Threatens you with violence or a weapon
  • Hits, kicks, shoves, slaps, chokes or otherwise hurts you, your children or you pets
  • Forces you to have sex or engage in sexual acts against your will
  • Blames you for his or her violent behavior or tells you that you deserve it


If you're gay, bisexual or transgender, you might also be experiencing domestic violence if you're in a relationship with someone who:


  • Threatens to tell friends, family, colleagues or community members your sexual orientation or gender identity
  • Tells you that authorities won't help a gay, bisexual or transgender person
  • Tells you that leaving the relationship means you're admitting that gay, bisexual or transgender relationships are deviant
  • Justifies abuse by telling you that you're not "really" gay, bisexual or transgender
  • Says that men are naturally violent